Tuesday, September 4, 2018

IWSG Blog Hop: Self-publishing or Traditional Publishing?

IWSG Badge
IWSG Blog Hop---the first Wednesday of every Month.

Hello and welcome to the Insecure Writer's Support Group Blog Hop!


What is the Insecure Writer's Support Group?


Founded by author Alex J. Cavanaugh, the Insecure Writer’s Support Group offers support for writers and authors alike. It provides an online database, articles and tips, a monthly blog posting, a Facebook and Instagram group, Twitter, and a monthly newsletter. To find out more, click this link: 
 Insecure Writer’s Support Group


The purpose of the group is 
* to share and encourage. 
* Writers can express doubts and concerns without fear of appearing foolish or weak. 
* Those who have been through the fire can offer assistance and guidance. 
*It’s a safe haven for insecure writers of all kinds! 

You're invited to become a member of this supportive group. Click here to sign-up to join.




September 5 question - What publishing path are you considering/did you take, and why?


I sent out 24 queries for my book for middle grade girls in 2009-2010 and received 24 rejections. Still believing the book was (and is) an inspiring book for girls, I decided to self-publish my first book. Let's just say, I've learned a lot about self-publishing from that experience. It's hard to sell books when you are all alone. 

Being part of  a network is an essential part of selling books because it helps to have many voices shouting about your book online. My first traditional publisher met me thanks to the network I joined when participating in an online course. I was blown away when she chose my first mystery story for her publishing company. After joining this publisher, I learned that a built-in network is a perk when one is published traditionally because all the authors in the house join together to promote each other. 

Meeting folks here at IWSG is also networking. These helpful writers share experiences, offer information about writing publishing, and marketing, as well as support each other with friendship and promotions.

If you have a strong network, then you'll have an easier time selling books, so you may consider self-publishing. You can build a network, but it takes time. In my case, with traditional publishers, I've had lots of support instantly from fellow authors.

Today I'm a "hybrid publisher." My mysteries are with a traditional publisher, Books We Love Publishing, and my non-fiction books are self-published. I'd say I have the best of both worlds!

# # #
The 5 W's of Story Guest Authors Event
Looking forward to hosting more guest authors this month and sharing the Five W's of their stories! Come back and discover authors and great reads. AND, You may win a giveaway from an author.

You're invited to be my guest on the 5 W's. Send me an email at jqrose02 (at) gmail (dot) com.

SEPTEMBER
12           C. Lee Mackenzie
26           Susan Davis
Follow this blog-- Focused on Story 
The IWSG members blog the first Wednesday of every month The list of bloggers is always available so you can hop around to the author blogs filled with humor, advice, and thought-provoking topics on writing and publishing. Find the list of participants at
 
Alex's IWSG page




25 comments:

  1. Sounds like you have a nice balance going on. I will probably do a bit of both too.

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    1. Thanks, Juneta. I'm happy with using both ways to get my books out to readers.

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  2. That is such a good point, about the network. I so struggle with that.

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    1. Yes, Jacqui, I too find it difficult, but being in IWSG has really helped me meet more folks.--like YOU! LOL

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  3. Hi JQ, that's such a good point about building a network. Even if you are traditionally published, you're still responsible for marketing your book. If only we could sit and write full time! Congratulations on all your writing success. It was brilliant to meet you through our publisher!

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    1. Helena, I wish we could have had the perks of the big 5 publishers spending money on authors to do the book tours way back when. All that has changed--except for the big name authors. So, if we have to do our own marketing, why not self-pub too? Really enjoyed getting together with you, Helena. Great time!

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  4. Networking or having a great network is important. That's what I think too and that is one of the reasons I am doing my best to build up my own network as I look for a publisher.
    Thanks for your advice.

    Shalom aleichem,
    Pat G @ EverythingMustChange

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    1. Pat, it takes time and constant attention. But so much fun to meet people online and make a connection.

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  5. Happy IWSG Day!

    Whether traditional or self-publishing, a community is very important. While writing is a solitary act, most of the time, selling and promoting goes better with a group. I agree; networking is key.

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    1. "Networking is key." I could have used that, Toi, in my post. !!!

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    2. If you ever blog about networking, take it, use it, own it. :D

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  6. It makes sense that networking is key. Hanging with the book bloggers has a whole new appeal. I read them for the tips... if you know what I mean. :-)

    Anna from elements of emaginette

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  7. I "fake-it-tell-I-make-it" when it comes to self promotion. If I didn't have a network and have community support, I probably wouldn't even fake it. Happy IWSG Day!

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    1. Thanks, Adrienne. Happy IWSG day to you too! Thanks for stopping in.

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  8. You found a good balance that works for you. Congrats! Networking is so important. Having a support group that helps you and cares about you is incredible. IWSG is such a group. And you are great about boosting others. I enjoyed being on your blog, and I love when you visit.

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    1. Thanks, Diane. I love hosting guests--just like you!! hee hee It' a chance to get to know each other on a personal basis by working together behind the scenes to produce the post. IWSG gives us that chance too.

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  9. I just love the fact that we do have options when it comes to publishing and it's no longer only one way.

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    1. I agree, Loni. The Big 5 publishers are not in charge of who can get published anymore.

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  10. It really does sound like the best of both worlds in regard to publishing. It's a balancing act, but I guess it gives you some kind of leverage over your life and career.

    24 rejections let alone 24 rejections and you kept at it. That is some persistence.

    Arlee Bird
    Tossing It Out

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    1. Persistence pays they always say. Maybe the rejections were meant to be because I dipped my toe into self-publishing because of all of the rejections.

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  11. Both networks are awesome for promoting books. You can't be the only one shouting about your book.

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    1. It takes a village to promote a book, Alex, eh?

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  12. I hate saying Me. Me. Me. I much prefer telling about other authors, and so I really appreciate when others give me a shout out. This business is all about networking, so I've been very grateful for IWSG. It has helped me a lot.

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  13. Without IWSG, I would have never met you. Thanks to Alex founding IWSG and all those folks who jumped in to participate in the blog hops. Besides it's fun!

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